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It was an attack against freedom of expression, and the world is rallying against it.

Gunmen had stormed the Paris office of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo on Jan 7, killing 12 people in what appears to be a religiously-motivated terror attack.

Charlie Hebdo has regularly courted controversy due its cartoons, which lampoons political and religious matters.

People around the world have nevertheless rallied behind the magazine and its fallen staff. They have gathered in cities everywhere, standing in solidarity while holding signs with the now iconic message: “Je Suis Charlie” — I am Charlie.

These are photos from all those gatherings, including some in Paris where the gunmen are still at large. But the message the people have sent is clear — we will not be terrorised into silence, and we will stand with those who have suffered for doing the same.

A vigil in Washington DC. -- Photo by EPA

In Washington DC. — Photo by EPA

An image to inspire journalists and cartoonists for generations. This photo was taken at Place de la Republique in Paris. -- Photo by EPA

An image to inspire journalists and cartoonists for generations. Taken at Place de la Republique in Paris. — Photo by EPA

Candles in Tirana, Albania. -- Photo by EPA

Candles in Tirana, Albania. — Photo by EPA

"Yo Soy Charlie" -- Spanish for "I Am Charlie". In Lima, Peru.

“Yo Soy Charlie” — Spanish for “I Am Charlie”. In Lima, Peru.

Chinese versions were printed in Hong Kong, where journalists and members of the public stood in solidarity outside the Foreign Correspondent Club. -- Photo by AFP

Mandarin and Cantonese versions were printed in Hong Kong, where journalists and members of the public stood in solidarity outside the Foreign Correspondent Club. — Photo by AFP

Outside the French Embassy in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Outside the French Embassy in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Trafalgar Square, London.

Trafalgar Square, London.

Journalists raising their press cards while others hold up pens at Place de la Republique. -- Photo by AFP

Journalists raising their press cards while others hold up pens at Place de la Republique. — Photo by AFP

In Rennes, western France. -- Photo by AFP

In Rennes, western France. — Photo by AFP

 

At the football match between French clubs Evian and Lille, where a minute's silence was observed. -- Photo by AFP

At a football match between French clubs Evian and Lille, where a minute’s silence was observed. — Photo by AFP

A candle light rally in Tunis, Tunisia. -- Photo by EPA

A candlelight rally in Tunis, Tunisia. — Photo by EPA

A solidarity event at Pariser Place in Berlin, Germany. -- Photo by EPA

A solidarity event at Pariser Place in Berlin, Germany. — Photo by EPA

Toulouse, southern France. -- Photo by EPA

Toulouse, southern France. — Photo by EPA

"Je Suis Charlie" displayed in several languages during a minute of silence at the main press room of the European commission in Brussels, Belgium. -- Photo by EPA

“Je Suis Charlie” displayed in several languages during a minute of silence at the main press room of the European commission in Brussels, Belgium. — Photo by EPA

"It's ink that should flow not blood!" A sign at the centre of the Place de la Republique. -- Photo by AFP

“It’s ink that should flow not blood!” A sign at the centre of Place de la Republique. — Photo by AFP

 

 

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Ian is the editor of R.AGE. He hates writing about himself.

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