Close
Exit

The nominations for the 87th annual Academy Awards are out and guess what… Birdman and The Grand Budapest Hotel take the lead with nine nominations each! Yay!

The Imitation Game is close behind after nabbing eight nods, followed by Boyhood and American Sniper with six nominations a piece, and The Theory of Everything, Foxcatcher, Whiplash and Interstellar tied with five.

It’s exciting because a few really talented actors/actresses got nominated for the first time — Foxcatcher‘s Steve Carell, Birdman‘s Emma Stone, The Theory of Everything‘s Eddie Redmayne and his co-star Felicity Jones.

Into the Woods actress Meryl Streep received her 19th nomination, while The Judge‘s Robert Duvall became the oldest actor to obtain an Oscar nod.

James Corden and Meryl Streep star in Into The Woods, a film that gives fairy tales a modern twist by exploring the consequences of the characters' wishes and quests.

James Corden and Meryl Streep star in Into The Woods, a film that gives fairy tales a modern twist by exploring the consequences of the characters’ wishes and quests.

The nominees woke up to great news after the announcement was made on the morning of Jan 16 by Star Wars: The Force Awakens director J.J. Abrams, Gravity director Alfonso Cuarón, Into the Woods actor Chris Pine and Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences president Cheryl Boone Isaacs.

It’s the first time that all 24 categories were revealed during the Academy Awards Nominations Announcement live telecast from the Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills, California.

Without further ado, here’s the full list of nominees:

(From left) Paul Schlase as Igor, Tony Revolori as Zero Moustafa, Tilda Swinton as Madame D. and Ralph Fiennes as M. Gustave in The Grand Budapest Hotel. - Photo by EPA

(From left) Paul Schlase as Igor, Tony Revolori as Zero Moustafa, Tilda Swinton as Madame D. and Ralph Fiennes as M. Gustave in The Grand Budapest Hotel. – Photo by EPA

Best Picture
American Sniper
Birdman
Boyhood
The Grand Budapest Hotel
The Imitation Game
Selma
The Theory of Everything
Whiplash

Best Actor
Steve Carell, Foxcatcher
Bradley Cooper, American Sniper
Benedict Cumberbatch, The Imitation Game
Michael Keaton, Birdman
Eddie Redmayne, The Theory of Everything

(From left) Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones play Stephen Hawking and Jane Wilde Hawking in The Theory Of Everything.

(From left) Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones play Stephen Hawking and Jane Wilde Hawking in The Theory Of Everything.

Best Actress
Marion Cotillard, Two Days, One Night
Felicity Jones, The Theory of Everything
Julianne Moore, Still Alice
Rosamund Pike, Gone Girl
Reese Witherspoon, Wild
Best Supporting Actor
Robert Duvall, The Judge
Ethan Hawke, Boyhood
Edward Norton, Birdman
Mark Ruffalo, Foxcatcher
J.K. Simmons, Whiplash

Best Supporting Actress
Patricia Arquette, Boyhood
Laura Dern, Wild
Keira Knightley, The Imitation Game
Emma Stone, Birdman
Meryl Streep, Into the Woods

Best Director
Alejandro González Iñárritu, Birdman
Richard Linklater, Boyhood
Bennett Miller, Foxcatcher
Wes Anderson, The Grand Budapest Hotel
Morten Tyldum, The Imitation Game

Hiccup Horrendous Haddock III (voiced by Jay Baruchel) and his dragon, Toothless in this  DreamWorks Animation film, How To Train Your Dragon 2.

Hiccup Horrendous Haddock III (voiced by Jay Baruchel) and his dragon, Toothless in this DreamWorks Animation film, How To Train Your Dragon 2.

Best Animated Feature Film
Big Hero 6
The Boxtrolls
How to Train Your Dragon 2
Song of the Sea
The Tale of the Princess Kaguya

Best Adapted Screenplay
American Sniper, by Jason Hall
The Imitation Game, by Graham Moore
Inherent Vice, by Paul Thomas Anderson
The Theory of Everything, by Anthony McCarten
Whiplash, by Damien Chazelle

Best Original Screenplay
Birdman, by Alejandro G. Iñárritu, Nicolás Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris Jr. & Armando Bo
Boyhood, by Richard Linklater
Foxcatcher, by E. Max Frye and Dan Futterman
The Grand Budapest Hotel, by Wes Anderson & Hugo Guinness
Nightcrawler, by Dan Gilroy

Best Cinematography
Birdman, Emmanuel Lubezki
The Grand Budapest Hotel, Robert Yeoman
Ida, Lukasz Zal and Ryszard Lenczewski
Mr. Turner, Dick Pope
Unbroken, Roger Deakins

Interstellar, a sci-fi film by Christopher Nolan, stars Matthew McConaughey (right) and Anne Hathaway.

Interstellar, a sci-fi film by Christopher Nolan, stars Matthew McConaughey (right) and Anne Hathaway.

Best Visual Effects
Captain America: The Winter Soldier
Dawn of the Planet of the Apes
Guardians of the Galaxy
Interstellar
X-Men: Days of Future Past

Best Documentary Feature
Citizenfour
Finding Vivian Maier
Last Days in Vietnam
The Salt of the Earth
Virunga

Best Documentary Short Subject
Crisis Hotline: Veterans Press 1
Joanna
Our Curse
The Reaper (La Parka)
White Earth

Best Film Editing
American Sniper, Joel Cox and Gary D. Roach
Boyhood, Sandra Adair
The Grand Budapest Hotel, Barney Pilling
The Imitation Game, William Goldenberg
Whiplash, Tom Cross

Best Original Song
Everything Is Awesome, from The Lego Movie, by Shawn Patterson
Glory, from Selma, by John Stephens and Lonnie Lynn
Grateful, from Beyond the Lights, by Diane Warren
I’m Not Gonna Miss You, from Glen Campbell: I’ll Be Me, by Glen Campbell and Julian Raymond
Lost Stars, from Begin Again, by Gregg Alexander and Danielle Brisebois

Best Production Design
The Grand Budapest Hotel, Adam Stockhausen and Anna Pinnock
The Imitation Game, Maria Djurkovic and Tatiana Macdonald
Interstellar, Nathan Crowley and Gary Fettis
Into the Woods, Dennis Gassner and Anna Pinnock
Mr. Turner, Suzie Davies and Charlotte Watts

Best Live Action Short Film
Aya
Boogaloo and Graham
Butter Lamp (La Lampe au Beurre de Yak)
Parvaneh
The Phone Call

Best Animated Short Film
The Bigger Picture
The Dam Keeper
Feast
Me and my Moulton
A Single Life

Best Sound Editing
American Sniper, Alan Robert Murray and Bub Asman
Birdman, Martin Hernández and Aaron Glascock
The Hobbit: Battle of the Five Armies, Brent Burge and Jason Canovas
Interstellar, Richard King
Unbroken, Becky Sullivan and Andrew DeCristofaro

Best Sound Mixing
American Sniper, John Reitz, Gregg Rudloff and Walt Martin
Birdman, Jon Taylor, Frank A. Montaño and Thomas Varga
Interstellar, Gary A. Rizzo, Gregg Landaker and Mark Weingarten
Unbroken, Jon Taylor, Frank A. Montaño and David Lee
Whiplash, Craig Mann, Ben Wilkins and Thomas Curley

It took two and half hours to transform Angelina Jolie into Maleficent, where she was given prosthetic cheekbones, nose and ears. As for the horns, they were custom-made to be lightweight, magnetic and removable.

It took two and half hours to transform Angelina Jolie into Maleficent, where she was given prosthetic cheekbones, nose and ears. As for the horns, they were custom-made to be lightweight, magnetic and removable.

Best Costume Design
The Grand Budapest Hotel, Milena Canonero
Inherent Vice, Mark Bridges
Into the Woods, Colleen Atwood
Maleficent, Anna B. Sheppard and Jane Clive
Mr. Turner, Jacqueline Durran

Best Foreign Language Film
Ida (Poland)
Leviathan (Russia)
Tangerines (Estonia)
Timbuktu (Mauritania)
Wild Tales (Argentina)

Best Makeup and Hairstyling
Foxcatcher, Bill Corso and Dennis Liddiard
The Grand Budapest Hotel, Frances Hannon and Mark Coulier
Guardians of the Galaxy, Elizabeth Yianni-Georgiou and David White

Best Original Score
The Grand Budapest Hotel, Alexandre Desplat
The Imitation Game, Alexandre Desplat
Interstellar, Hans Zimmer
Mr. Turner, Gary Yershon
The Theory of Everything, Jóhann Jóhannsson

Is your favourite movie/actor/actress nominated? Or you’ve not seen all the movies? Well, you have a month before the 2015 Oscars, which is happening on February 22 at Hollywood’s Dolby Theatre. And Neil Patrick Harris will play host!

About

Our entertainment and celebrity news expert who happens to be disturbingly good at laser tag. Graduated with a degree in communications at 21 and went straight into the magazine business. She not only writes for R.AGE now, but also coordinates our long-running BRATs young journalist programme.

Tell us what you think!

BTW…

Championing children’s education

Education director-general Datuk Dr Habibah Abdul Rahim speaks on the importance of empathy-based education, the challenges of adapting education policies in light of the Covid-19 situation, and her “dream” education system.

Read more Like this post3

I lost my mother to the Japanese war

 Whenever Allied planes bombed Sandakan town as part of its campaign to liberate Borneo, Daniel Chin Tung Foh’s grandfather would rush the whole family into a bomb shelter behind their house.  During its heyday, the British North Borneo Company had developed Sandakan into a major commercial and trading hub for timber, as well as […]

Read more Like this post0

A witness to the Double Tenth revolt

 Chua Hock Yong was born in Singapore, but his grandfather moved the family to British North Borneo (now Sabah) to establish their business in 1939 when he was a year old.  The Japanese invaded Borneo shortly after, but the family continued living in their shophouse in Gaya Street, Jesselton, now known as Kota Kinabalu.  […]

Read more Like this post3

An encounter with victims of the Sandakan Death Marches

 When the Second World War came to Borneo, Pelabiu Akai’s mother moved the family back to their village in Nalapak, Ranau.  Although the Japanese were known to be ruthless and brutal conquerors, they left the villagers to their own devices and Pelabiu had a largely uneventful life – until she came across gaunt-looking Allied […]

Read more Like this post4

Sarawak’s only living child prisoner of war

 Jeli Abdullah’s mother died from labour complications after giving birth to him and his twin brother. To his Bisaya tribe, this was seen as a bad omen, and his father did not know what to do with the twins.  Fortunately, an Australian missionary couple decided to adopt the newborns. But misfortunate fell upon the […]

Read more Like this post3

Lest we forget

AFIO Rudi, 21, had never thought much about his grandfather Jeli Abdullah’s life story until an Australian TV programme interviewed the 79-year-old about being Sarawak’s last surviving World War II child prisoner of war (POW). The engineering student then realised that despite living in Sarawak all his life, he also didn’t know very much of […]

Read more Like this post5

A native uprising against Japanese forces

 Basar Paru, 95, was only a teenager when his village in the central highlands of Borneo was invaded by the Japanese Imperial army.  “The Japanese told us not to help the British. They said Asians should help each other because we have the same skin, same hair,” Basar recalled. “But we, the Lun Bawang […]

Read more Like this post2

Left behind in wartime chaos

 Kadazan native Anthony Labangka was 10 years old when the Japanese Imperial Army invaded Borneo during World War II.  Sitting in the verandah of a modern kampung house on a hot afternoon in Kampung Penampang Proper, where he has lived his whole life, Anthony recalls the hardships of the Japanese Occupation.  The villagers were […]

Read more Like this post2
Kajai R.AGE Wan Ifra Journalism Documentaries Digital Media Awards

R.AGE Audience Survey 2019 + Office Tour contest

Want to be in the running to meet R.AGE producers and journalists? Take part in our R.AGE Audience Survey 2019 by Feb 17, 2019!

Read more Like this post2

BRATs Goes to Genting!

The final BRATs camp of the year promises to be the coolest – literally!

Read more Like this post0

The Hidden Cut

Female circumcision is a very common practice in Malaysia, but the procedure is still almost completely unregulated.

Read more Like this post2

#TeamSatpal: Turtle-y in Trouble

The 21st century brings unseen threats to local turtle conservation efforts.

Read more Like this post0
Go top