Close
Exit

Story and photos by #TEAMMAYLEE
brats@thestar.com.my

THERE’S rarely a boring day at work for Syamsuri Ahmad, who’s part of the technical team at SkyTrex Langkawi Adventure Park.

Thrill seekers from around the world go to the park to take on its adrenaline-pumping obstacle courses built around 30m up in the trees of the Langkawi jungle. Syamsuri, 43, however, gets to do it every day.

He and his colleagues go through the courses every day to make sure everything is perfectly safe.

“The safety of our participants is our top priority,” said Syamsuri. “We make sure every component throughout all the courses is working properly and safe to be used.”

“The safety of our participants is our top priority,” said Syamsuri. “We make sure every component throughout all the courses is working properly and safe to be used.”

It might sound like a chore to some, but Syamsuri said it’s always an interesting experience. Apart from his work with the technical team, Syamsuri also doubles up as a guide, so aside from maintaining the safety standards of the park, he also gets to interact with the participants.

Most of the time, things go smoothly and the participants have a tonne of fun, because the course is built to be perfectly safe. When the BRATs visited the park, we had to go through a very thorough safety briefing and practice everything on a mini course.

But every once in a while, something completely out of their control happens.

“For example, there was a tourist who passed out halfway up a rope ladder,” Syamsuri said. When that happens, the only way to safely evacuate the participant is to physically hoist him/her to safety.

“I had to carry her up the rest of the way. I almost passed out too!” he said with a laugh.

Safety is Skytrex's priority, so Syamsuri Ahmad is part of the team that checks the equipment every morning before the park opens.

Safety is SkyTrex’s priority, so Syamsuri Ahmad is part of the team that checks the equipment every morning before the park opens.

Even though the job can be quite a burden (literally!), Syamsuri loves every second of it.

The adrenaline junkie left behind a career in security to join SkyTrex.

He’s been there since they started building the park in March last year, and plans to stay in the job for the long haul.

“I love meeting and interacting with people,” he said. “The younger customers are the best! Even though they may be scared to take on the course, their desire to try something new usually overrides that fear,” said the father of five.

Handling fears is also part of his job description.

They occasionally get participants who are too afraid or tired to complete the course, he said. To overcome this, he tries his best to motivate them along the way, failing which he’ll distract them by talking about the natural environment in which SkyTrex is located.

“I talk to them about the jungle and its many plants, and they usually end up finishing the course without even realising it!” he said.

Familiar with the jungle, Syamsuri frequently introduces tourists to its wonders. Here, he points out daun cemumar, an edible leaf that tastes like curry.

Familiar with the jungle, Syamsuri frequently introduces tourists to its wonders. Here, he points out daun cemumar, an edible leaf that tastes like curry.

This tactic works on local and international tourists alike, but Syamsuri wishes more Malaysian tourists would be open to trying the park out.

“When some local families visit our park, the parents choose not to participate in the courses along with their kids. But the courses are actually designed to cater to an entire family,” he said.

“Anybody can do the courses. If the Middle Eastern tourists in their jubah can zipline safely, so can you!”

To emphasise his point, he shared the story of a 90-year-old woman who came with her family, gamely tried out the course, and made it all the way.

“Though she took more time than usual, we were very proud of her for stepping up to the challenge and completing it!” he said.

team may lee

About

BTW…

BRATs Goes to Genting!

The final BRATs camp of the year promises to be the coolest – literally!

Read more Like this post0

#TeamSatpal: Turtle-y in Trouble

The 21st century brings unseen threats to local turtle conservation efforts.

Read more Like this post0

#TeamMayLee: The Point of Being Malaysian

In a modest village situated on the sandy shores of Terengganu, the production of ikan bilis has formed the livelihoods of most families for multiple generations.

Read more Like this post1

#TeamSatpal: The Fisherwomen’s Tale

When men go out to sea, these inspiring wives stay on land to support the family fishing business. by TEAM SATPAL On the coastline of Pantai Penunjuk in Kijal, Terengganu, lies the village of Kampung Tengah. This hidden gem on the map is home to fishing families whose main commodity is ikan bilis, or anchovies. […]

Read more Like this post0

#TeamMayLee: Conservation Conversation

Resorts World Kijal serves as a pioneer within the multitudes of hotels who now offer turtle- related services

Read more Like this post0

#TeamClarissa: Scoring in a Different Kind of Net

What life is like for a small-town fisherman in Terengganu.

Read more Like this post0

#TeamClarissa: Slowly but Surely

Turtle sanctuary efforts pay off as an unprecedented number of turtles return to nest.

Read more Like this post0

#TeamSatpal: Taking the wheel

CAPTAIN Yogeswaran Gopal Krishnan first stumbled across what would turn out to be a lifelong passion for sailing when he accompanied his friend to work on a ship as a crew member.

Read more Like this post3

#TeamMayLee: From dreams to reality

CRUISING on a yacht with the sea breeze in his hair, Hamie Azuar Hamizan looks like he was born for the sea life.

Read more Like this post4

#TeamClaire: Plenty of opportunities at sea

DID you know that the first solar-powered boat in Malaysia was mostly built by local university students?

Read more Like this post1

#TeamSatpal: Racing to new heights

A FEAR of heights might have ended Muhammad Ziyad Muhammad Hamzah’s horse riding career before it even started, but growing up in a family of professional endurance horse trainers gave him the motivation to continue.

Read more Like this post0

#TeamMayLee: The trick rider’s tale

ABU Ubaidah Muhammad Hamzah is a showman on a horse. The 24-year-old specialises in trick riding, a special equestrian field that combines athletics, acrobatics and horse riding.

Read more Like this post0
Go top